Household Stuff

How teak patio furniture and other items are used in the gardens of the world

Claiming that a certain garden design style is explicitly representative of a specific region would undeniably spark some ferocious debate. And rightfully so, because ultimately, as much as there are preferred styles of garden design more widely adopted in specific regions, it always comes down to personal preference and your own personal iteration of that identified style.

That said, however, there are indeed some garden design styles and preferences which you can quite easily associate with specific regions around the world. Teak patio furniture for example is very popular in some parts of the west but maybe less so in the east.

Africa

As vast and diverse as the continent of Africa is, there’s a general trend that can be observed throughout the continent, across the many different borders. Generally speaking, an African garden makes full use of the vast amounts of space people generally tend to have for them. In the rural areas and suburbs, it’s not uncommon to see well-manicured lawns and trimmed hedges, while the ghettos and townships generally try to recreate that immaculateness, albeit with more limited spaces.

It’s more about working with what Mother Nature dictates as a set of standards to follow, which is why you might have something like a thatched roof that looks like it might have grown naturally!

Southeast Asia

Gardens in Southeast Asia generally have more of a “portable” feel, with all sorts of planters made to appear as if they’re part of the main building structure. These could be planters permanently built into structures such as walls and balconies, or portable ones like those which match teak patio furniture.

Otherwise, unlike quintessential African gardens, where a large portion of the land is dedicated to both functional and decorative gardening, in Southeast Asia, the bulk of the gardening space would be allocated to functional gardening with little room for too much teak patio furniture.

North America

Although leisure or so-called “display” gardening seems to be a rapidly dying practice in many parts of the world, North America seems to be the one place where this is most visible. Of course, it differs when you compare something like the typical suburban home in Canada to one south of the border, in the USA, but generally speaking, gardening seems to be disappearing altogether.

The same could perhaps be said of many parts of Europe, where economic development sees the emergence of housing that takes more of the form of blocks of flats and city apartments. If a city dweller seeks to spend some time surrounded by flora, they would perhaps get up from their balcony-bound teak patio furniture to go out and enjoy public green spaces. So pot plants and some small planters have become synonymous with whatever little bit of gardening can be attributed to a North American style.

South America

In South America, generally speaking, even when there appears to be quite a lot of space to work with, homeowners choose to fill the plot up with as much of the building structure as they can. You’ll hardly see any lawn, if at all, but they do love their trees and other shrubberies, particularly if that flora blooms with some bright and beautiful colours.